All The Swirl "Must Reads", August 2016

 Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Kimberly Charles

My "must read" is from: Terry Gross, Fresh Air
Article: Eating Yogurt is Not Enough: Rebalancing the Ecosystem of "The Microbes within us." 
Author: Ed Yong
Why is this a must read?:  For probably 25 years, I've been drawn to alternative medicine practices and the attendant nutritional regimes that lead to a healthy biology within the human body.   Moving to California 18 years ago accelerated the availability of practitioners and modalities I could consider.  Perhaps it was my ingrained philosophy growing up that the best defense is a good offense as a peacetime military brat, but I've always felt that a pro-active approach to life, particularly health, was the best way to ensure longevity.   Years ago I did extensive blood work to determine how I might fine tune my inner biology to get the best from nutrition, address any vitamin deficiencies and be sure I was taking charge of my fate.    It's been helpful in getting my numbers in balance and getting me back on track when the wine business tempts me with its delights.   My inner nerd grooved on the interview Terry Gross conducted with award winning science writer and TED talk presenter, Ed Yong, who has contributed to The Atlantic, National Geographic, Wired among other outlets.   His inaugural book looks at the good, bad and ugly bacteria that populate our bodies and that of all living beings.   I appreciate the clear-eyed insights he shared in his interview with her, even stating that Probiotics don't really do the job we think they are when we ingest them.    It's inspired me to be an even more informed patient the next time I get a consult from my holistic team.    

 Photo courtesy of the New York Times

Photo courtesy of the New York Times

Alex Fondren

My "must read" is from: New York Times
Article: Dinner, Disrupted
Author: Daniel Duane
Why is this a must read?:  Perhaps the most eloquent treatise on San Francisco's infamous income disparity that's resulted from the Silicon Valley tech boom, as seen through the lens of the Bay Area's increasingly elitist and economically partisan, almost manically 'hip' restaurant culture.  Duane puts it best: "The tech-boom economy also infects everyone inside and outside of it with both dreams of striking it rich and fears of getting priced out of town. That’s why chefs don’t just open that one restaurant they’ve always dreamed about. They invent catchy new restaurant “concepts” and borrow mountains of money to create dining rooms that end up with no human touch and food that looks remarkably similar to Instagram photographs of dishes created by trendsetters like [David] Kinch and [Daniel] Patterson…As Mr. Patterson explained, 'The food has never been better and the business climate has never been worse and so we are speeding toward a cliff.”

 Photo courtesy of Punch

Photo courtesy of Punch

Hillary Lyons

My "must read" is from: PUNCH
Article: How Do You Make a Wine that Costs $3.50?
Author: Megan Krigbaum
Why is this a must read?: I love this article because it delves into the murky world of massive-scale winemaking to explore the real costs of this industry. We are fortunate to live in a time where people value sustainability, seasonality, and locality, where the American public is incredibly informed about where their food comes from. But it is only recently that this same philosophy has trickled into the sphere of wine. In exploring the nebulous string of companies behind one $3.50 bottle of supermarket wine, Krigbaum goes down a rabbit hole of transnational partnerships and umbrella corporations, highlighting just how complex and globalized our modern wine industry is. Don't get me wrong: I think that affordable wines are a great way to deconstruct the wine snobbery that can scare away so many budding oenophiles. But a $3.50 bottle masks the tangible environmental and social costs of our bulk wine industry. Reading this article made me think more critically about how I 'vote' with my wine dollars, and I know that they next bottle I buy, I'll be sure to examine the label.

 Photo courtesy of GQ Magazine UK

Photo courtesy of GQ Magazine UK

Anthony Salazar

My "must read" is from:  GQ Magazine UK
Article: The New Toast Masters
Author:  Jennifer Bradly
Why is this a must read?: Jennifer Bradly gives a quick breakdown for all the gentlemen out there about serving and drinking champagne in 2016. As a big fan of champagne myself, I almost always drink a glass or two during weekends. For me, it does not matter even if it is during lunch or dinner; every meal is the perfect time to pop a bottle of champagne. I have already discovered some new pairings with champagne because of my brunch adventures around the city. Another thing that I have been on the look out here in San Francisco is for bars or restaurants that serve champagne-based cocktails. I love my Mimosas, Bellinis, and Kir Royals but I have been searching for my new go-to drink every Sunday. I will always remember this quote by Napoleon Bonaparte about Champagne; “In victory, you deserve a Champagne. In defeat, you need it.”

 Photo courtesy of Modern Farmer

Photo courtesy of Modern Farmer

Jules Lydon

My "must read" is from: Modern Farmer
Article: (Beer) Waste Not, Want Not: 5 Ways Breweries Recycle Their Waste
Author: Andrew Amelinckx
Why is this a must read?: This week I've been working on a new piece for Thirsty Bear Brewing Company and when I interviewed their founder, Ron Silberstein, he brought attention to the large amount of waste brewing creates and how he has worked to make a seemingly unsustainable practice sustainable. According to Amelinckx, "beer-making takes up to 20 liters of water (or more) per one liter of brewed beer. Plus, there’s a lot of other stuff that’s leftover from the process, like spent grains—about 85 percent of the byproduct from beer production, and the equivalent of a pound or more per six pack—and the dregs, which is mostly yeast." Fortunately, there are a few ways to reuse the wort and hops after the process occurs. One of which is treating waste water, which makes me wonder if this is applicable to alleviate the Flint Crisis and other recent dirty water issues. It may have been written in 2015, but the ideas here may be used more frequently in the future.

 Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times

Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times

Sam Foxworthy

My "must read" is from: Los Angeles Times
Article: David Burnett's Olympics photography: The poetry of sport, written in pictures
Author: Liesl Bradner
Why is this a must read?: This is a short and sweet piece about photographer David Burnett, who has shot at every Summer Olympics since 1984. His photos are captivating, largely because he captures athletes at moments of apparent calmness and tranquility, exposing their untouched focus and form. Additionally, his work exposes the heart of the athlete in a goose bump evoking, inspirational way. 

 Photo courtesy of Condé Nast Traveler

Photo courtesy of Condé Nast Traveler

Greer Shull

My "must read" is from: Condé Nast Traveler
Article: Stone Brewing to Open a Craft Beer Hotel in San Diego
Author: Katherine LaGrave
Why is this a must read?: Craft breweries seem to be popping up everywhere, however, Stone Brewing, who has recently celebrated their 20th anniversary, has put an exciting new twist on this beer craze with the announcement of their new brewery hotel, scheduled to open in 2018. According to Condé Nast Traveler, room service is available in the form of growler delivery, and guests will be greeted with a complimentary Stone beer upon check-in at the bar-style lobby. This announcement is sure to inspire new “bucket list” additions for beer lovers everywhere. 
 


All the Swirl is a collection of thoughts and opinions assembled by the staff and industry friends of Charles Communications Associates, a marketing communications firm with its headquarters in San Francisco, California. We invite you to explore more about our company and clients by visiting www.charlescomm.com.