CCA's Green Guide to the Bay: Jamber Wine Pub

As we dive into the New Year, the Charles Communications team recommits ourselves to sustainability a long held tenet at the company. It is thanks to the many eco-conscious producers and green businesses here in San Francisco that we are fortunate enough to dine in good conscience and do our part to protect the earth's resources. Given that the Bay Area innovates in so many arenas be it tech, energy, farming you name it, we like to study local businesses who are progressive in their philosophies in the hope of inspiring others.   Our 2016 summer intern Jules Lydon was our beat reporter and here we feature a truly sustainable business in the South of Market (SOMA) neighborhood, Jamber


 Jamber wine pub. Photo courtesy of Eater SF.

Jamber wine pub. Photo courtesy of Eater SF.

Jamber, a self-proclaimed "wine pub" since 2012 serves California wines, craft beers, and comfort foods,  It is the kind of folksy bar that makes you feel right at home with its salvaged wood and Zeppelin soundtrack. But that's not the only reason we love it.

Ever since they opened the pub, brother and sister team Jess and Matt have been guided by a strong commitment to sustainability. While both had long dreamed of opening a restaurant together, Jess had experience in the beer industry and Matt was a wine geek so they decided to couple their passions and open Jamber with a unique commitment: none of their beverages would be bottled. 

 Wine on tap Photo courtesy of The Real Review.

Wine on tap Photo courtesy of The Real Review.

Jess had discovered wine on tap while working in Seattle, and the siblings realized the environmental ripple effect that such a minor decision could make. Generally, when we think of "sustainable wine" we typically think of vineyard practices, not what comes afterwards going to market.  Though wine bottles are recyclable, the amount of energy required to produce an average of 300 bottles per barrel has a significant impact on the environment.

 Free Flow Wines facility. Photo courtesy of Free Flow Wines.

Free Flow Wines facility. Photo courtesy of Free Flow Wines.

Alternatively, transferring wine directly to kegs cuts down on all the energy that would be spent bottling, labelling, corking, as well as the waste that all those materials would produce. Not to mention, because bottled wine stays fresh for only a couple of days after it is opened, bars and restaurants can lose as much as 25% of their inventory to oxidization. With kegs on the other hand, wine is not exposed to oxygen until it leaves the tap, so keg wine is capable of staying fresh up to one year.

Once decided on this commitment, Matt and Jess set out to select the wines and beers that would flow through their taps, personally visiting wineries and breweries to find products that combined environmental responsibility, quality and accessibility. After all, they wanted their pub to be welcoming and encourage a deep appreciation of food and drink good for you as well as the planet. Whether you'd like to idle away an hour tasting pours or fill a growler, Jamber is is a place to put your money where your mouth is. 


All the Swirl is a collection of thoughts and opinions assembled by the staff and industry friends of Charles Communications Associates, a marketing communications firm with its headquarters in San Francisco, California. We invite you to explore more about our company and clients by visiting www.charlescomm.com.